Road Trip Wednesday #77: Your Manuscript Music, Revisited


This Week’s Topic:
Way back in November 2009, we asked what songs represent or influence your WIP. SEVENTY road trips later (seriously! seventy!), we’re coming back to the topic to ask:

If your WIP or favorite book were music, what song(s) would it be?

Of course, not all of you are writing a novel. If you’re not writing one, choose your favorite novel, tell us the title, author, what songs it would be, and why.

As for me, I’m going to choose Brian Jacques’ Redwall series. If it were a series of songs it would be the entire Pirates of the Carribean Trilogy soundtrack. Why? Because both pack a lot of adventure into them, there is romance involved in both, and a lot of the adventures both happen on ships in large bodies of water. What other music could be better for adventuresome woodland creatures?

______________________________

YA Highway is a blog (www.yahighway.com) by a group of young adult authors from all over the world! And every Wednesday YA Highway’s contributors post a weekly writing- or reading-related question and answer it on their own blogs. You can hop from destination to destination, from their blog, and get everybody’s unique take on the topic.

But, why not do the same thing on our blog every week? I’ll post their question and you can put your answers in our comments section, or on your own blog and link back to it in our comments (and theirs too, if you’d like, because I’m sure they’d enjoy reading your answers!)

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The Fist by Derek Walcott


The fist clenched round my heart

loosens a little, and I gasp

brightness; but it tightens

again. When have I ever not loved

the pain of love? But this has moved

 

past love to mania. This has the strong

clench of the madman, this is

gripping the ledge of unreason, before

plunging howling into the abyss.

 

Hold hard then, heart. This way at least you live.

 

 

Wow. This poem by Derek Walcott is a new favorite because of how intensely it captures these feelings of infatuation that can catch you at any moment. The movie Love, Actually has a scene like this. The little boy has admitted to his stepfather that he’s been quiet and withdrawn because he’s in love. Relieved, his step-dad ruffles his hair, saying he thought it was something worse. The boy, puzzled, responds with “worse than the total agony of being in love?” And sometimes yeah, total agony is the best way to describe it. But sometimes its comforting to know that you’re not alone in feeling that way.

 

Road Trip Wednesday #74: The Year 2011


This Week’s Topic:
Assuming we make it through the 2012 apocalypse, what do you imagine the publishing world will look like 100 years from now?

This is a great question! But, I’m gonna say, if all the sci-fi books are right, publishing will be similar to ebooks, only everything will get downloaded right into our heads. It’ll be similar to the book Feed by M.T. Anderson, not that I like that idea, cause I don’t. And, I happen to like books in print. They have specific smell that’s sooo good! lol, and when you’re tired and your eyes hurt, it’s easier to read print than something on a computer. 

What do all of you guys think? Is there a book that you think most represents what the future might bring? How so? Is the wave of the future something you like, or are you against it? Let’s hear your thoughts!_____________________________

YA Highway is a blog (www.yahighway.com) by a group of young adult authors from all over the world! And every Wednesday YA Highway’s contributors post a weekly writing- or reading-related question and answer it on their own blogs. You can hop from destination to destination, from their blog, and get everybody’s unique take on the topic.

But, why not do the same thing on our blog every week? I’ll post their question and you can put your answers in our comments section, or on your own blog and link back to it in our comments (and theirs too, if you’d like, because I’m sure they’d enjoy reading your answers!)

The Rose That Grew From Concrete – Tupac


There is a lot of asphalt and concrete in downtown Boston. But seeing the leaves in the very beginning stages of budding always makes me optimistic that spring will eventually wind its way here. Today the weather is just warm enough to convince me we’ll be seeing green soon, even though we may think it’s still just out of reach.

More than ten years after his death, the life and work of Tupac Shakur still resonate with his fans. Primarily remembered as a rapper, he was also a poet. The poem that provided for the title of his published poetry collection follows below.

The Rose That Grew From Concrete

Did u hear about the rose that grew from a crack

in the concrete

Proving nature’s law is wrong it learned 2 walk

without having feet.

Funny it seems but by keeping its dreams

it learned 2 breathe fresh air

Long live the rose that grew from concrete

when no one else ever cared!

 

I love the image of a rose pushing its way through the solid mass of a sidewalk, finding any slight chance to reach the surface. One of the things Tupac might have been trying to say with this poem was that even though the odds may seem stacked against you, its possible to succeed in what you want. What do you think? If you liked this poem, check out more by the poet here.


April Snow Showers bring… Poetry!


I’d like to begin by saying, ‘Hello!’ I’m Maggie, and I’m a new intern at the Teen Room in Copley. I’ll be hanging out Tuesdays and Fridays, so if you’re in the room, you’ll definitely see me helping out where I can.

Since April is National Poetry Month, it seems like now is an appropriate time to share some poems, new and old, that for one reason or another, are Awesome. We’re going to start off with a suggestion by one teen, Alex. And so, I present to you Still I Rise, by the wonderful poet Maya Angelou.

You may write me down in history
With your bitter, twisted lies,
You may trod me in the very dirt
But still, like dust, I’ll rise.

Does my sassiness upset you?
Why are you beset with gloom?
‘Cause I walk like I’ve got oil wells
Pumping in my living room.

Just like moons and like suns,
With the certainty of tides,
Just like hopes springing high,
Still I’ll rise.

Did you want to see me broken?
Bowed head and lowered eyes?
Shoulders falling down like teardrops.
Weakened by my soulful cries.

Does my haughtiness offend you?
Don’t you take it awful hard
‘Cause I laugh like I’ve got gold mines
Diggin’ in my own back yard.

You may shoot me with your words,
You may cut me with your eyes,
You may kill me with your hatefulness,
But still, like air, I’ll rise.

Does my sexiness upset you?
Does it come as a surprise
That I dance like I’ve got diamonds
At the meeting of my thighs?

Out of the huts of history’s shame
I rise
Up from a past that’s rooted in pain
I rise
I’m a black ocean, leaping and wide,
Welling and swelling I bear in the tide.
Leaving behind nights of terror and fear
I rise
Into a daybreak that’s wondrously clear
I rise
Bringing the gifts that my ancestors gave,
I am the dream and the hope of the slave.
I rise
I rise
I rise.

The power in those words, huh?! Incredible. My favorite line is “with the certainty of tides.” I love the idea that the speaker’s willpower is a force of nature just like the tide. If you like this, feel free to check out other poetry of Angelou’s here. And if you have a favorite poem, leave a comment so we can post it later this month.